Avionics Design – December 2016                               
December 2016

The Avionics Design monthly E-newsletter from the editorial staff of mil-embedded.com covers hardware and software avionics designs and certification issues in the commercial and military avionics markets in the U.S. and Europe via the Military Embedded Systems partnership with Aviation Maintenance magazine and the Aviation Electronics Europe show.

In partnership with:
Aviation Electronics Europe





Backup PNT methods are essential for GPS-denied environments
Backup PNT methods are essential for GPS-denied environments

Backup methods of position, navigation, and timing (PNT) are essential for warfighters operating within GPS-denied environments. Warfighters rely on the U.S. NAVSTAR global positioning system (GPS) and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) for military operations, but are encountering an intense escalation of jamming and spoofing attacks.


Thermal management critical to military electronics upgrades
Thermal management critical to military electronics upgrades

With new platforms scarce in today’s budget-constrained defense environment, more funding emphasis has been placed on upgrading the existing electronics suites in avionics, radar, shipboard, and other military applications, which means solving problems such as reducing the heat generated by modern processors in size, weight, and power (SWaP)-constrained environments and managing long-term life cycle costs. In this Q & A with Andy Mason, Head of the Technology Platforms Group at Kontron’s Avionics, Transportation, and Defense division, he discusses the thermal management challenge in embedded computing upgrades and how open architectures and a building block approach that leverages commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) can help manage it across multiple platforms while keeping development costs down.


Getting the Requirements Right for Safety Critical Systems

Sponsored by: Jama and AFuzion
January 19, 11am ET


Intel Xeon Cores Power High Performance and Low SWaP Complex Sensor Solutions

This White Paper will discuss how modern day processors can address the challenges of controlling today's more complex sensor systems using an IR imaging system example.



Autumn acquisitions touch military embedded computing, safety-critical markets
Autumn acquisitions touch military embedded computing, safety-critical markets

Two key acquisitions colored the fall season in the embedded world, both of which will affect military embedded computing applications. One was at the component level, the other at the board and subsystem level, as Qualcomm bought NXP, formerly Freescale, for about $47 billion and then soon after Mercury Systems picked up avionics computer supplier Creative Electronic Systems (CES) for about $38 million.


FACE conformance program
FACE conformance program

September 2016 marked a major milestone along the long road to avionics software standardization: the last essential component of the system developed by U.S. Navy and Army aviation authorities and their suppliers clicked into place.


Next-gen navigation: Tapping signals of opportunity
Next-gen navigation: Tapping signals of opportunity

Need to navigate and global-positioning system (GPS) signals are unavailable? No problem. Amidst increasing concerns about heavy reliance on the U.S. NAVSTAR GPS and global navigation system (GNSS), a team of University of California–Riverside (UCR) researchers has created a navigation system that takes advantage of existing cellular signals –– no GPS signals required.


Technology insertion: Balancing performance and stability
Technology insertion: Balancing performance and stability

Embedded computing systems have benefited enormously from the flood of innovation in the electronics industry: Military programs over the years have enjoyed ever faster processors, smaller form factors, and steadily declining prices per unit of performance. At the same time, military programs have requirements, which fly in the face of commercial market trends. These programs’ lives are measured in decades rather than months.


How much and what kind of coverage analysis is enough?
How much and what kind of coverage analysis is enough?

The discussion of coverage analysis can bring up a number of different assumptions that do not always agree. Does it mean checking that all the code has been executed? Does it mean that all requirements have been exercised and tested? Does it bring up some number other than 100 percent that can be relied upon for functioning code? What we want to do is to assure ourselves that a program has been thoroughly tested to the point it can be relied upon, even in life-threatening situations. How do we achieve this and what aspect of “coverage” will allow us to rest easy?



F-22 sustainment contract won by Lockheed Martin
F-22 sustainment contract won by Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin Corp. won a $536 million contract modification from the U.S. Air Force for sustaining the F-22 Raptor.





F-16 aircraft to receive Raytheon's mission computer upgrade
F-16 aircraft to receive Raytheon's mission computer upgrade

Raytheon engineers will develop and produce F-16 Modular Mission Computer Upgrade for the U.S. Air Force.


FAA issues final rule for small general aviation airplanes
FAA issues final rule for small general aviation airplanes

Officials at the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a final rule that overhauls the airworthiness standards for small general aviation airplanes. The new Part 23 rule will reduce costs for the aviation industry as well streamline approval of new technologies into the marketplace.


NATO fleet will receive digital flight deck upgrades from Boeing
NATO fleet will receive digital flight deck upgrades from Boeing

NATO representatives received the first of fourteen cockpit upgrades for the E-3A Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft from Boeing. Upgrades include five full-color glass displays, which provide crewmembers with customizable engine, navigation, and radar data to improve mission execution.


Avenger UAV makes initial flight
Avenger UAV makes initial flight

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems (GA-ASI) announced that it has completed the initial flight of its Avenger Extended Range (ER) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), an extended-range version of its multimission jet-powered Predator C Avenger craft, which has accumulated over 13,000 flight hours to date. GA-ASI says that the flight took place on October 27th at the company's Gray Butte Flight Operations Facility in Palmdale, California.


NASA and AT&T work together to research traffic management solutions
NASA and AT&T work together to research traffic management solutions

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and AT&T engineers are researching traffic management solutions for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in order to find an Unmanned Aircraft System Traffic Management (UTM) solution that supports the safe and secure operation of drones in the national airspace.


NRL completes UAV flight with hydrogen-powered fuel cell
NRL completes UAV flight with hydrogen-powered fuel cell

Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) researchers completed the first flight of the Ion Tiger unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a new built in-house hydrogen-powered fuel cell.




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